Food

Students may no longer be able to afford pasta and sauce in the near future

Students may no longer be able to afford pasta and sauce in the near future
(Picture: Getty)

This year is just getting worse and worse.

First, we found out that houmous is becoming a scarce commodity, thanks to a shortage of chickpeas. Then came the news that a poor raisin harvest was going to push up prices of hot cross buns just in time for Easter.

And now, friends, an even more significant part of our culinary lives is under threat.

Something we can all cook. Something we can all eat.

The price of pasta and tomato sauce is rocketing. In fact, the cost has almost risen 20% in the past year.

According to mySupermarket, tinned tomatoes, puree and passata are the worst hit, with prices increasing on average from January 2017 to January 2018 – meaning we’re now paying around 30p more per product.

Like the other shortages, this might be down to weather-induced fruit and veg shortages; tomatoes, in particular, were in short supply last year due to poor harvests.

As for pasta, packets have gone up about 17p per packet – meaning that if you just want a bowl of penne and tomato sauce, the whole lot is going to cost you 47p extra to make this year.

Students may no longer be able to afford pasta and sauce in the near future
(Picture: mySupermarket)

Researchers found the biggest price hikes across supermarkets by looking at figures from Asda, Ocado, Tesco and Sainsbury’s, with cakes, salads and pre-cut veg also suffering.

The good news, however, is that a few products are actually cheaper this year, including baby care products (7% cheaper), frozen Yorkshire puds (-8%) and laundry products (-10%).

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Oh, and don’t let this put you off eating as many vegetables as possible. While tomatoes and pre-cut veg are more expensive, whole vegetables are actually cheaper.

The price of vegetables, in general, has actually dropped by 17%.

So…cauliflower rice risotto, anyone?

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