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Javelin, high jump medals for Australia on final day in main stadium

Hamish Peacock and Nicola McDermott added to Australia's medal haul in the field events in the athletics program, winning silver and bronze respectively on the final day of competition inside Carrara Stadium.

With the four marathon events still to come on Sunday, Australia looked to wrap up its campaign on the track and in the field on a positive note, with Peacock and McDermott the stand-out performers.

Tasmanian Peacock, a bronze medallist in the men's javelin Glasgow four years ago, produced a best throw of 82.59 metres to be runner-up to India's Neeraj Chopra, who won gold with 86.47m.

Australia's Luke Cann threw 76.99m to finish sixth.

"The Indian (Chopra) was far too good today," Peacock said.

"He had that significant lead, so to get that silver medal and to throw a good distance … was really satisfying."

Nicola McDermott of Australia reacts following a successful jump in the Women's High Jump Final.

McDermott was the surprise packet for Australia, claiming the bronze medal in the women's high jump via a personal best height of 1.91m.

"In my heart I knew if I did a PB I could be up there so I said to myself 'don't stop until you're in the gold position'," McDermott said.

"But landing bronze is like aiming for the moon and getting along the stars."

Lavern Spencer provided the Caribbean nation of Saint Lucia with its first medal of the Games by taking gold with a clearance of 1.95m.

Australia's male sprinters showed encouraging signs for the future with a fourth-place finish in the men's 4x100m relay.

By the time the baton was passed from Jack Hale to anchor Josh Clarke, Australia was in second place behind eventual winner England but the host nation could not hold off South Africa and Jamaica, who claimed the minor placings.

Australia clocked 38.58, with England winning in 38.13.

It was a sweet victory for England's Zharnel Hughes following his disqualification for making contact with Jereem Richards in the men's 200m final after crossing the finish line in first place.

Australia's Women's 4 x 100m Relay team react after being disqualified in the Final.

Australia was disqualified from the women's 4x100m relay, with Brianna Behan stepping on the lane marking in the opening leg.

But there was a flurry of drama at the final change when Melissa Breen, running the last leg for Australia, fall to the track as she pushed off in preparing to take the baton from Riley Day.

Breen said her hamstring gave way as she tried to accelerate at the top of the home straight.

"My hammy just didn't appreciate what I was doing today," Breen said.

England made it a sweep of the 4x100m relays, with victory in the women's event in a time of 42.46.

In another touching moment of the Games, Australia's Celia Sullohern, Madeline Hills and Eloise Wellings again waited on the track to congratulate the last two remaining athletes in the women's 5,000m final.

The Australian trio displayed outstanding sportsmanship on Monday night when they stayed back to encourage Lineo Chaka of Lesotho as she finished the 10,000m final and on Saturday they were joined by several other athletes.

Chaka finished in 18th place in the 5,000m final, with Sharon Firisua of Solomon Islands the 19th and last athlete across the line, as their fellow athletes and the crowd warmly appreciated their efforts.

Kenya's Hellen Obiri won gold in 15:13.11, with Sullohern (15:34.73) fifth, Wellings (15:39.02) eighth and Hills (15:46.92) 10th.

Among the final events of the afternoon, Australia's Jordan Williamsz (sixth), Ryan Gregson (ninth) and Luke Mathews (12th) finished well outside of the medals in the men's 1,500m, with Kenya's Elijah Manangoi winning gold.

And Australia was fifth in the women's 4x400m relay, as Jamaica enjoyed a clear victory.

Original Article

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